National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: Agricultural Safety and Health Centers

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), provides national leadership in the prevention of workplace illnesses and injuries. This organization focuses on industries and occupations, hazards, exposures, diseases, injuries, chemicals, safety, prevention, and emergency preparedness and response.

The Agricultural Safety and Health Centers (Ag Centers) are the primary means by which NIOSH promotes agricultural safety and health for owners, managers, and workers. Established in 1990, the Ag Centers are responsible for conducting research activities, educational programs, and prevention projects that address priority areas in agricultural safety and health. Click here to learn more about the objectives for the Ag Centers.

The 10 Ag Centers are located in various regions across the United States. They have similar objectives based on NIOSH protocols, but each Ag Center also focuses on specialty projects relative to their emphasis and/or geographical area. Contact the Ag Centers in your area to learn about their pilot grant programs and additional ways that you can partner with their organization. Listed below are the 10 Ag Centers with a brief description of their territory and primary areas of interest. Click on the Ag Center to be directed to its website.

Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (CS-CASH)

Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center – Provides services in a seven-state region.

Primary focus: Reduction of injuries and illnesses in the agricultural community with specialized focus on agricultural injury surveillance, allergic and nonallergic asthma, hearing loss, sleep deprivation, education needs of diverse agricultural populations, promotion of AgriSafe and Certified Safe Farm programs for farmers and ranchers, and information dissemination through the National Ag Safety Database, electronic communication, and participation in agricultural meetings and events.

Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health (GPCAH)

Location: University of Iowa – Provides services and programs throughout the Midwest.

Primary focus: Roadway crashes involving farm equipment, musculoskeletal disorders among agricultural workers, gas and dust exposure, epidemiological studies, and education and training to prevent occupational injury and illness among agricultural workers and their families. Special emphasis is placed on risk factor research, intervention, outreach, education, and translation activities.

High Plains Intermountain Center for Agricultural Health and Safety (HICAHS)

Location: Colorado State University – Provides services and programs throughout Montana, North Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.

Primary focus: Organic dust aerosols, respiratory disease, pesticides, engineering of tractor rollover protective structures (ROPS), and health needs of dairy farm workers.

National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (NCCRAHS)

Location: National Farm Medicine Center, Wisconsin – National resource in the area of children and youth safety.

Primary focus: Safety and prevention programming for children living, working, and visiting in agricultural or rural areas. Special projects include safe agricultural work guidelines for hired and family youth, creating safe play areas on farms, model rural child care programs, safety guidelines for agritourism operators, media guidelines, and the Childhood Agricultural Safety Network.

The Northeast Center of Agricultural Safety and Health (NEC)

Location: Bassett Healthcare, New York – Provides services and programs throughout the New England and Mid-Atlantic regions.

Primary focus: Promotes agricultural safety and health research, education, and prevention activities with special projects focusing on social marketing of rollover protection, tractor retrofitting initiatives, confined space manure storage entry, musculoskeletal disorders, farm worker health, and injury surveillance.

Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (PNASH)

Location: University of Washington – Provides services and programs throughout Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.

Primary focus: Injury and illness prevention especially for hired laborers, migrant/seasonal workers, and children with a specialized focus on projects that emphasize pesticide exposure, cholinesterase, heat-related illnesses, injuries associated with new and emerging technologies, and ergonomics in the tree fruit industry.

Southeast Center for Agricultural Health and Injury Prevention (SCAHIP)

Location: University of Kentucky – Provides services and programs throughout Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Primary focus: Special populations, cost analysis of tractor and other types of farm-related injuries, and educational opportunities for public health professionals related to agricultural safety and health. Special projects focus on aquaculture safety, injury prevention programs, surveillance of poisonings, and agricultural education programs for nurses.

Southeastern Coastal Center for Agricultural Health and Safety

Location: University of Florida

Primary focus: Unique occupational safety and health challenges for persons working in agriculture, fishing, and forestry in the southern and coastal states of Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and North and South Carolina.

Southwest Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention, and Education (SWAG)

Location: University of Texas Health Science Center – Provides services throughout Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, and Oklahoma.

Primary focus: Improving the safety and health of agricultural, forestry, and fishing workers through projects that build and leverage strategic partners. Special projects currently focus on poultry dust exposure, respirator use among poultry workers, neuromotor function and work injuries among Hispanic adolescents, social marketing with the Vietnamese shrimper community, and safety and assistive technology education for farmers and ranchers.

Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety Center (WCAHS)

Location: University of California, Davis

Primary focus: Western agricultural health and safety issues including health among migrant and seasonal farm workers with an emphasis on ergonomics of labor-intensive crop work. Special projects focus on respiratory hazards, heat-related illnesses, ergonomics, pesticides, health for women and children, and dairy safety training.

Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH)

Location: University of Minnesota.

Primary focus: Occupational hazards in pork production, zoonotic diseases in agricultural workers, and surveillance of disease and injury in the dairy industry.

 

Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Ellen M. Heywood, Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health – ellen-heywood@uiowa.edu
Barbara Lee, Marshfield Clinic – lee.barbara@mcrf.mflddin.edu
John May, Northeast Center – john.may@bassett.org
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Stephen J. Reynolds, High Plains Intermountain Center for Agricultural Safety & Health – Stephen.Reynolds@Colostate.edu
Risto Rautianen, Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health rrautianinen@unmc.edu
Amanda Wickman, SW Ag Center – Amanda.Wickman@uthct.edu
Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
 

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

ASABE Logo

The American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE) is a technical and educational organization for engineers and others dedicated to advancement of engineering applicable to agricultural, food, and biological systems. Originally founded in 1907 as the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, the organization changed its name in 2005 to the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) to include advances in biology to the engineering profession.

ASABE Standards Program

ASAE adopted its first standard practice in 1912. The ASABE Standards Program, which is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), is the recognized standard for engineering in agricultural, food, and biological systems. According to ASABE, standards are defined as engineering requirements or specifications prepared to define materials, products, processes, tests, testing procedures, and performance criteria to achieve a specific purpose. These standards are developed because there is a need to address a common problem. ASAE/ASABE has adopted approximately 75 standards that are totally or largely safety oriented.

Click here for more information about the ASABE Standards Program.

Ergonomics, Safety. and Health Division

The Ergonomic, Safety. and Health (ESH) Division was formed in 2002 to lead and coordinate the activities of ASABE so that the talent of its members are effectively applied to agricultural safety, ergonomic, and health needs of constituents served by ASABE. The ESH Division encompasses all aspects of agricultural safety, ergonomics, and health for users of equipment, systems, and facilities. The major areas of responsibility are addressed by five committees and special task forces. The five committees are ESH-01 Executive/Oversight Committee, ESH-02 Policy and Forward Planning Committee, ESH-03 Standards Committee, ESH-04 Technology Exchange Committee, and ESH-05 Nominations Committee.

ASABE Activities

In addition to the standards programs, ASABE offers annual professional conferences, publications, a technical library, and professional journals, including the Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health (JASH).

Click here to visit the organization’s home page and learn more about its activities.

 
Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Charles V. Schwab, Pennsylvania State University – cvschwab@iastate.edu
Aaron Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
 

 

Ag Safety and Health Upcoming Events

Ag safety at FFA Convention

Agricultural safety and health (ASH) events allow you to meet other ASH professionals, learn about current research projects, and explore ways to collaborate with others. The following is a list of upcoming national or regional ASH events:

AgrAbility National Training Workshop

Madison, WI
March 23 – 26, 2020

Agricultural Safety and Health Conference of America (ASHCA)

Las Vegas, NV
March 19 – 20, 2020

International Society of Agricultural Safety and Health Conference (ISASH)

Ashville, NC
June 22 – 26, 2020

2020 National FFA Convention
October 28 – 31, 2020
Indianapolis, IN

National Association of Extension 4-H Agents
Boise, Idaho
October 19 – 22, 2020

Summarized and Reviewed by:

  • Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
  • Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University (has since retired)
  • Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu

American Society of Safety Engineers

ASSE Logo

The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) was formed in 1911 and is the world’s oldest professional safety society. The organization’s mission is to promote the expertise, leadership, and commitment of its members while providing members with professional development opportunities and advocacy and standards development. With over 30,000 worldwide members, the organization works to create safer work environments by sharing information and best practices to prevent workplace fatalities, injuries, and illnesses.

ASSE AgBranch Logo

The Food & Agribusiness Branch of the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) provides an avenue for agricultural safety professionals to network and gain knowledge. Examples of the topics addressed by this branch include tractor safety, noise exposure, confined space entry, and so on. Once a person is a member of the Manufacturing Practice Specialty through ASSE, he or she can join the Food & Agribusiness Branch at no additional cost. Click here to visit ASSE website and learn more about the Food & Agribusiness Branch of the ASSE.

 

Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Mike Wolf, Agricultural Branch, ASSE – mwolf01@harris.com
Aaron Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
 

 

Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

CASA Logo

(Source: Canadian Agricultural Safety Association)

The Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA) is a national nonprofit organization promoting farm safety in the agricultural sector. CASA’s vision is a country where no one is hurt farming, and CASA is working with partners in government and business and with farming organizations across the country to support initiatives that equip producers, their families, and their workers with the information and tools needed to make farms safe places to live, work, and play.

Click here to visit the CASA website and learn more about the following agricultural safety and health resources:

  • Safety Shop: A library of resources that includes articles, videos, presentations, and farm safety training kits
  • Canadian Injury Data: Studies that examine long-term trends in agricultural injuries in Canada
  • Farm Safety Grants: A listing of funding available for the development of tools and resources or training to help make communities safer (available to Canadian applicants only)

Canada FarmSafe Plan

Agriculture continues to rank as one of the most dangerous occupations. Farmers and ranchers may say that safety is important, but very few have gone through the process of developing a safety plan for their agricultural operations. The CASA has developed a program called Canada FarmSafe to help farmers manage safety and health activities on their operations. Click here to be directed to the FarmSafe page. From this page you can download the basic Canada FarmSafe Plan at no charge to help you start developing a safety plan. Canada FarmSafe provides instructions that will enable you to develop safety and health policies, identify and control hazards, communicate responsibilities, and review your plan.

 

Reviewed and Summarized by:
Glen G. Blahey, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association  GBlahey@casa-acsa.ca

Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Michelle French Lancaster, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association – mfrenchlancaster@casa.acsa.ca
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
 

 

International Society for Agricultural Safety and Health (ISASH)

ISASH Logo

(ISASH Logo. Source: International Society for Agricultural Safety and Health)

The National Institute for Farm Safety (NIFS) recently approved a name change to become the International Society for Agricultural Safety and Health (ISASH). This organization began in the 1940s with a meeting of three farm safety specialists and has grown into the ISASH, with members from across the globe. Over the years, ISASH and its predecessors have been instrumental in the development and implementation of the slow-moving vehicle (SMV) emblem, the development of agricultural hand signals, the promotion of rollover protective structures (ROPSs) for tractors, and positive changes in safe machinery design.

ISASH’s Mission Statement

ISASH (formerly NIFS) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the professional development of agricultural safety and health professionals. ISASH leads the national and international agricultural community in the prevention of agricultural injury and illness. ISASH provides opportunities for sharing information about research and intervention programs, improving professional skills and knowledge, networking, and other supportive activities.

Click here to be directed to the ISASH home page. From the home page, you can learn more about the organization’s history, join as a member, locate agricultural safety and health professional education events, and explore links to other safety organizations.

 
Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Robert E. Petrea, University of Illinois  repetrea@illinois.edu
Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
 

 

 

Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America

ASHCA Logo

(ASHCA Logo. Source: Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America

In 2007, the nonprofit Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America (ASHCA) was formed to address new and ongoing safety and health issues affecting production agriculture. Members of this organization include producers, agribusinesses, insurance companies, government organizations, medical professionals, farmworkers, and safety professionals.

The mission of ASHCA is to proactively address ongoing and emerging occupational safety and health issues affecting U.S. agriculture.

Council Goals:

  • Pursue national strategies, based on reliable data and information about emerging issues, to reduce agricultural injuries and fatalities
  • Work with leaders representing producers, agribusinesses, insurance companies, safety associations, and other organizations to guide the development of effective delivery systems for safety and health information
  • Influence research priorities to rapidly identify best management practices for worker safety and health

ASHCA is governed by a board of directors, the majority of whom have a background in industry. Standing committees include membership, strategic planning and programming, and public relations. ASHCA hosts annual meetings and conferences, and provides workshop presentations on its Web page.

ASHCA provides opportunities to learn about:

  • best practices for creating a safety culture among agricultural workers,
  • the impacts of safety on profitability and job satisfaction, and
  • working with other leaders to serve as the “voice” of safety and health issues for farm and ranch producers and agricultural workers.

For more information about ASCHA, click here to be directed to their home page. From the home page, you can learn about membership options, conferences, and resources.

 

Use the following format to cite this article:

Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America. (2012) Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://www.extension.org/pages/64420/agricultural-safety-and-health-council-of-america.

 
Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Carla Wilhite, University of New Mexico  CWilhite@salud.unm.edu
Aaron Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
 

Progressive Agriculture Safety Day

The Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® program, formerly known as the Progressive Farmer Farm Safety Day Camp program, was developed by the Progressive Agriculture Foundation as a means of disseminating information about farm and ranch safety for children. The program trains local community members and provides them with resources to organize and conduct day-long safety training sessions for children. Sessions include age-appropriate, hands-on learning activities and address such topics as:

  • fire safety,
  • first aid,
  • electrical safety,
  • all-terrain vehicle (ATV) safety, and
  • animal safety.

Click here to be directed to the Progressive Agriculture Safety Day home page. From the home page, you can access the dates for upcoming Safety Days or sign up to host a Safety Day.

Target Audience

Children ages 8 to 13 are the primary target audience for Safety Days, but curricula are also available for younger children (ages 4 to 7) and whole families. Anyone interested in providing safety information to youth (e.g., Cooperative Extension educator, staff of nonprofit organizations, hospital personnel, etc.) can apply to serve as a Safety Day coordinator. 

Support for Communities Hosting a Safety Day

The Progressive Agriculture Foundation provides the following items and support to those communities selected to participate in the Progressive Agriculture Safety Day program:

  • training for the Safety Day coordinator
  • materials to plan and conduct the event
  • free T-shirts and take-home bags for Safety Day volunteers and participants
  • publicity for the event in the Progressive Farmer magazine, Farm Progress magazine, and Farm Journal and through national media outlets
  • sample media releases
  • liability and excess medical insurance to cover participants who attend the event
  • a large “Welcome” banner for use at the Safety Day
  • information exchange
  • support via phone and email

Evaluation

In addition to providing training and resources, the Progressive Agriculture Foundation provides Safety Day participants and leaders materials to evaluate the program and give feedback. Evaluations are conducted immediately following the event and, when grant funding is available, at intervals after the event. Evaluations collected in post-event interviews conducted three months and one year after the Safety Day have shown significant increases in knowledge and safe behaviors.

Resources

Click here for more information about the Progressive Agriculture Foundation.

Click here to be directed to the Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health website, a national clearinghouse for agricultural safety and health information.

 
 

Use the following format to cite this article:

Progressive Agricultural Safety Day. (2012) Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://www.extension.org/pages/63425/progressive-agriculture-safety-day.

 
Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Susan Reynolds-Porter, Progressive Agriculture Safety Days & Progressive Agriculture Foundation – farmsafety@aol.com
Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu

Progressive Agriculture Foundation

After an overwhelming response to an article titled “Just Say No, Please Say No” in the September 1990 issue of the Progressive Farmer magazine about farm fatalities and the numbers of children who have been injured or killed during farm and ranch accidents, the publishers of Progressive Farmer magazine took action. In 1995, the Progressive Farmer founded the Progressive Farmer Farm Safety Day Camp program and began sponsoring youth day-camp sessions that focused on issues of farm safety. The camp program began in the South and Midwest. Now called the Progressive Agriculture Safety Day program, the program has grown to include camps in 43 states, two U.S. territories, and Canada.

As interest in the day camps grew, so too did the need to form a nonprofit charitable organization that could accept donations and recognize donors for their sponsorship. In 2002, the Progressive Agriculture Foundation was formed. Oversight for the foundation is provided by a board of directors.  

Mission

The mission of the Progressive Agriculture Foundation is to provide education and training to make farm, ranch, and rural life safer and healthier for all children and their communities.

Resources

Click here to learn more about the foundation and find out how you can get involved in coordinating a Safety Day or become a sponsor to support the Safety Day program.

The articles below provide more information about Safety Days and youth safety:

  • Click here to view the article “Age-Appropriate Tasks for Children on Farms and Ranches.”
  • Click here to view the article “Progressive Agriculture Safety Day.”
  • Click here to view the article “Youth ATV Safety.”
 
 

Use the following format to cite this article:

Progressive Agricultural Foundation. (2012) Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://www.extension.org/pages/63426/progressive-agriculture-foundation.

 
Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu

Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu

Susan Reynolds-Porter, Progressive Agriculture Safety Days & Progressive Agriculture Foundation – farmsafety@aol.com
Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu

 

NCERA 197: Agricultural Safety and Health Research and Extension

Use the following format to cite this article:

NCERA 197: Agricultural safety and health research and extension. (2012) Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://www.extension.org/pages/63381/ncera-197:-agricultural-safety-and-….

 

Agriculture, forestry, and fishing continue to have a work-related death rate that is eight times higher than the all-industry average (National Safety Council, 2009). Production agriculture accounted for more than 75% of the work-related deaths within the agriculture, forestry, and fishing category in 2007 (U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009). Injuries and fatalities continue among children, youths, and seniors—age groups that are generally not part of other industries. 

A committee called the North Central Education/Extension Research Activity (NCERA) 197 was founded in 2000 to develop strategies to use the land-grant system’s research and extension capacity and the experience of agricultural producers to reduce work-related injuries, illness, and death. The NCERA 197 committee created the National Land-Grant Research and Extension Agenda for Agricultural Safety and Health: National Agenda for Action, a document that prioritized 12 areas with 115 individual topics relating to agricultural safety and health in which research or extension gaps exist (Committee on Agricultural Safety and Health Research and Extension, 2003). The National Agenda for Action was the first agricultural safety and health agenda by the land-grant system since 1943, and it has been used by the Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing (AgFF) Sector Council of the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as a resource document for its National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) plans and by the Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America (ASHCA). The Canadian government has also used this document as the foundation for its agricultural safety strategic plan.

The NCERA 197 committee was reappointed in 2005—when it was renamed from NCR 197 to NCERA 197—and again in 2011. After the completion of the national agenda, the committee focused efforts on the development of a white paper concerning agricultural equipment on public roads. This effort was designed to do the following:

1. Identify research, policy, and extension and outreach priorities for these agencies:

  • federal departments of Agriculture and Transportation; 
  • NIOSH; 
  • state departments of agriculture, transportation, and law enforcement; 
  • county governments; and
  • organizations related to production agriculture. 

2. Identify possible design and practice standards, goals, or guidelines for farm equipment manufacturers, standard-setting organizations, and government agencies (Committee on Agricultural Safety and Health Research and Extension, 2009).

Click here to be linked to the NCERA 197 committee’s white paper titled Agricultural Equipment on Public Roads.

Ag Equip on Public Roads Publication Cover

The second priority area for the NCERA 197 committee is agricultural confined spaces. Click here to be linked to the Research and Extension Agenda for Agricultural Confined Spaces.  The NCERA 197 committee will investigate gaps in extension  and research regarding engineering, educational, and legislative controls designed to reduce the frequency and severity of incidents involving confined spaces in agricultural workplaces. The NCERA 197 committee plans to complete the following activities:

  1. Summarize the research literature, engineering needs, and outreach opportunities related to agricultural confined space hazards;
  2. Convene a national conference on this topic;
  3. Encourage additional research and outreach by land-grant universities to reduce hazards of agricultural confined space; and
  4. Encourage increased standards activity by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) to reduce hazards of agricultural confined spaces.

Ag Confined Space Publication Cover

The NCERA 197 committee will identify additional topics on the basis of the National Land-Grant Research and Extension Agenda for Agricultural Safety and Health: National Agenda for Action document. The committee members will partner with land-grant universities to increase infrastructure support for agricultural safety and health at land-grant universities.

Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health

The NCERA 197 committee was instrumental in developing the Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice (CoP). FReSH is designed to provide agricultural safety and health information in a user-friendly format to agricultural producers through peer-reviewed article summaries, frequently asked questions, and “ask the expert” opportunities. Click here to be directed to the FReSH CoP.

Resources

Click here to be directed to a summary of the National Land-Grant Research and Extension Agenda for Agricultural Safety and Health: National Agenda for Action.

Click here to open the NCERA197 Impact Summary (2010-2015),

 

 

Use the following format to cite this article:

NCERA 197: Agricultural safety and health research and extension. (2012) Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://www.extension.org/pages/63381/ncera-197:-agricultural-safety-and-….

 

 

Sources

Agricultural equipment on public roads. (2009) North Central Education/Extension Research Activity Committee (NCERA) 197, Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service. Retrieved from http://nasdonline.org/static_content/documents/2065/d001906.pdf.

Census of fatal occupational injuries (CFOI) – Current and revised data, 2007 census of fatal occupational injuries (revised data). (2009) U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshcfoi1.htm.

Injury facts. (2009 edition) National Safety Council (NSC). Itasca, IL.

National land grant research and extension agenda for agricultural safety and health. (2014) NCR-197 Committee on Agricultural Safety and Health Research and Extension. Retrieved from http://extension.psu.edu/business/ag-safety/youth-safety/national-safe-t….

 

Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Aaron Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu