Safety in Agriculture for Youth

 

Safety in agriculture for youth project logo

Safety in Agriculture for Youth (SAY) is a grant project funded by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Institute of Food and Agriculture to develop a sustainable and accessible national clearinghouse for agricultural safety and health curriculum for youth. For the funding period of 2017 – 2021, the SAY Project now consists of three funded project that each focus on a different aspect of youth farm safety. The projects are housed at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, the Ohio State University and Purdue University and will respectively focus on the SAY National Clearinghouse Project (e.g., SAY Clearinghouse, curricula submission and review, and marketing), Youth Farm Safety Education and Certification (YFSEC) Instructor Training and YFSEC Youth Training.

***New Resources***

Teacher resource guides will assist instructors with integrating curricula hosted in the SAY Clearinghouse by providing teaching methods to instructors on preparing students with safety instruction. The following teacher resource guides are available:

Animal Systems Career Pathway Teacher Resource Guide – Right from the Start: Safety Awareness for Livestock Producers

Animal Systems Career Pathway Teacher Resource Guide – Positive Animal Handling (Stockmanship) on Dairy Farms

Power, Structural and Technical System Teacher Resource Guide

SAY National Clearinghouse

The SAY National Clearinghouse consists of two different types of educational products: formal curricula and other supporting resources and provides their alignment to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources (AFNR) Career Cluster Content Standards related to agricultural safety and health. Click on the link below to access the SAY National Clearinghouse:

         SAY National Clearinghouse

Each educational resource has a page that provides you with a description, type of resource, language (English and/or Spanish), website link to resource, and alignment chart to AFRN standards.

Submitting your Ag Safety and Health Curriculum

Click HERE to be directed to submission instructions and link to submit your curriculum through the Curriculum Alignment Submission Tool (CAST).

Belief Statements & Guiding Principles for Youth Working in Ag

The Safety in Agriculture for Youth (SAY) Project National Steering Committee developed a belief statements document regarding youth working in agriculture. The belief statements outline consensus-based beliefs and principles that promote safety and health for youth working in agriculture. Click HERE for more information.

Injury Risk Assessment for SAE

The injury risk assessment for supervised agricultural experience (SAE) was developed by Utah State University through the SAY Project. Click HERE to access all of the components of the risk assessment.

OSHA 10-Hour General Industry (Agriculture) Course

CareerSafe is now offering an online training course providing training for entry level workers and employers. Visit the SAY National Clearinghouse for more information about the online training course.

National Youth Farm and Ranch Safety Symposium

The National Youth Farm and Ranch Safety Symposium was held in October 2014 in Lexington, KY. Click HERE to learn more about the symposium and to view the presentations.

Connecting with SAY

How to get connected? To stay up-to-date on the SAY Project and its objectives, sign up for alerts by subscribing to the listserv at SAY-L-subscribe-request@lists.psu.edu. Follow SAY on Facebook (AgSafety4u) and Twitter (@AgSafety4u). If you have any feedback or suggestions, email Linda Fetzer at lmf8psu.edu.

Newsletters and Reports

Additional Resources

What is the SAY National Clearinghouse? Webinar and Slides

SAY Project Background

Webinar – SAY What? A New Look at Farm Safety Education (introductory overview of the SAY Project)

Powerpoint from Webinar on November 14, 2013

Summarized and reviewed by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Penn State University – lmf8@psu.edu

Davis E. Hill, Penn State University (has since retired)

Dennis J. Murphy, Penn State University (has since retired)