Ag Safety & Health Community of Practice (CoP) eNews

 

Recent editions of the CoP’s eNews:

Website take 'FReSH' look at Agricultural Safety and Health

eXtension logo
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 30, 2015
 
CONTACT:
Aaron Yoder, aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
Linda Fetzer, lfetzer@engr.psu.edu
 

           Website takes ‘FReSH’ look at agricultural safety and health

A plethora of agricultural safety and health information is available by typing a few key words into a search engine, but trying to synthesize and validate the masses of content can be difficult. The Farm & Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice (CoP), www.extension.org/agsafety, gathers and disseminates practical, research-driven information.

FReSH obtains most of its content from the Cooperative Extension system based at land-grant universities, and from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) agricultural centers. But FReSH also works with smaller organizations such as Farm Safety for Just Kids and AgriSafe Network to disseminate their resources as well.

The CoP is a collaborative effort between universities, industry, and government, with more than 100 individual members from multiple regions of the country who review and produce agriculture safety and health information. These members work to provide usable resources such as videos, publications, online safety courses, and webinars to the general rural population, agricultural producers, and agricultural safety and health professionals.  Financial support for the project is provided by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture; eXtension; and CHS Inc.

“The aim of eXtension is to summarize the health and safety information that is out there.  We don’t want to duplicate anything.  The goal is to get the information all in one place where people can find it and be brought to the original sources,” said Aaron Yoder, the CoP Leader of FReSH.

FReSH is currently working to integrate ag safety and health information related to food systems and climate change, including information on wearable technology throughout the food system. Wearable technology such as smart watches and fitness technology have the potential to provide safety to field workers, including the ability to detect heat illness. Members of the CoP are examining the entire system of food production to determine where useful messaging for safety and health can be distributed.

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AgriSafe Network

AgriSafe Network logo

AgriSafe Logo

AgriSafe is dedicated to training health and safety professionals positioned to serve the unique health care needs of farmers. AgriSafe uses innovative technology to deliver the best training by experts in the field. A nonprofit national membership organization, AgriSafe provides a variety of services to assist health and safety professionals.These services include:

  •          continuing education via workshops and webinars         
  •          technical assistance
  •          clinical resources
  •          network opportunities with other clinicians and experts in the field
  •          updates on cutting edge developments in agricultural health and safety 

For more information visit www.agrisafe.org.

Summarized by:
Natalie Roy, AgriSafe Network – nroy@agrisafe.org
 
Reviewed by:
Linda Fetzer, Pennsylvnania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Aaron Yoder, University of Nebraska Medical Center – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu

 

National Youth Farm and Ranch Safety Symposium

The National Youth Farm and Ranch Safety Symposium, an event funded as one objective of the Safety in Agriculture for Youth (SAY) project, provided an opportunity for interaction and discussion among stakeholder groups, educators, parents, and agricultural employers who provide or seek training opportunities for young workers. The overarching goal of the symposium was to bring together a diverse group of professionals to enhance awareness of, access to, and utilization of farm and ranch safety materials by youth and by adults who instruct or work with youth.

In a concise format, speakers presented a broad range of topics. Their purpose was to initiate constructive dialogue about ideas, resources, gaps, and best practices for safely involving youth on the farm or ranch, regardless of whether the youth are working for family operations or for general hire.

The symposium was held October 27–28, 2014, in Louisville, Kentucky. For a PDF of the symposium program, please click here.

This article identifies the keynote speakers and provides links to video clips from each of the four plenary sessions.

Plenary One: Current Regulations—the Good, the Bad, and the Opportunities

Brad Rein – National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA

Karen Garnett – U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division

Shari Burgus – Farm Safety for Just Kids

*Marilyn Adams – Farm Safety for Just Kids

Barbara Lee – National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

Dawn Castillo – National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

Aida Balsano – National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA

Plenary Two: Youth for Hire—Employment Options in Agriculture

Karen Garnett – U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division

Kristi Boswell – American Farm Bureau Federation

*Marty Tatman – American Farm Bureau Federation

Mike Honeycutt – National Council for Agricultural Education

Sydney Snider – Ohio FFA, State President

Amy Liebman – Migrant Clinicians Network

Frank Gasperini – National Council of Agricultural Employers

David Hard – National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

* Kitty Hendricks – National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

Barbara Lee – National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

Mary Miller – National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety, Consultant

Plenary Three: When can I?Age versus Competence

David Schwebel – University of Alabama at Birmingham

Barbara Lee – National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

Mike Honeycutt – National Council for Agricultural Education

Bill Field – Purdue University

Plenary Four: Making the Time to Teach Ag Safety and Health—Formal versus Nonformal (Education and Teaching Resources)

Kirby Barrick – American Association for Agricultural Education

Dennis Riethman – Former Vocational Agriculture Instructor

Lisa Lauxman – National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA

Aaron Yoder – NIOSH Ag Center, Central States

Shari Burgus – Farm Safety for Just Kids

Bernard Geschke – Progressive Agriculture Foundation

Mary Miller – National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety, Consultant

 

Summarized by:
Kathy Mann, Ohio State University
 
Reviewed by:
Dave Hill, Penn State University – deh27@psu.edu
Dennis Murphy, Penn State University – djm13@psu.edu
Linda Fetzer, Penn State University – lmf8@psu.edu

 

 

 

Enhancing Biosecurity at Fairs and Shows

Photograph is copyright Luc Asbury and is used under Creative Commons licensing.

 

This webinar was presented by Scott Cotton, University of Wyoming Area Educator and EDEN Chair-elect, and Curt Emanuel, Purdue Extension Educator and Boone County Extension Director. Cotton has been with Extension since 1993 and involved in disasters since 1972. His emergency/disaster roles have ranged from medical technician and firefighter to ICS/NIMS instructor and disaster exercise facilitator.  Emanuel is a former professional horse trainer. Since joining Purdue Extension in 1990, he has been involved in emergency and disaster planning at the local and state levels.

“Biosecurity at fairs and shows really begins well before the events. Animals should be vaccinated and receive health checks on a regular schedule. Their owners should be aware of disease risks and know how to care for the animals if they become ill or injured,”  says Cotton. “Fairs are very public events and generate a good bit of interaction between people and animals. It is vital to their good health that biosecurity measures are practiced before, during and after these events.”

Emanuel notes that the potential for spreading disease at fairs and shows depends on those practices. “Exposing healthy animals and people to sick animals can lead to a disaster far wider than the local event. All animals should be identified and their owners should present documentation of the animals’ health checks when they arrive for inspection prior to the event. There should be an established protocol for the inspections as well as a procedure for housing and handling the animals during the event. In addition, there should be an animal biosecurity team on hand to take action if there are causes for concern.”

Susan Kerr is a Washington State University Extension Livestock and Dairy Specialist. She moderated the session. “Many types of disease issues can arise at fairs and shows. Many of these problems can be prevented if proper biosecurity measures are established and enforced. Scott Cotton and Curt Emanuel will help us be more aware of the risks associated with animal diseases in public venues and show us how we can help reduce those risks.”

This recording is available and is brought to you by the Extension Disaster Education Network, an eXtension Community of Practice

Tire Safety: Expiration Dates

Imagine cruising down the road on a beautiful spring afternoon or returning home after a long day at work when suddenly the back right tire of your vehicle explodes. Luckily, you maintain control and safely maneuver to the side of the road. The tires are new, purchased a few months ago from a local tire shop. How could this happen to new tires?

The fact is that all tires have an expiration date. Surprisingly, many consumers and sellers of tires do not know about tire expiration dates. An uninformed consumer thinks he or she purchased brand new tires when in reality those tires may have been sitting on the shelf for years. Even though the tires were never used on a vehicle, they are still several years old. Every tire has a birth date—the day it was manufactured—and an expiration date that is six years from that manufacture date. Most automobile manufacturers warn drivers to replace vehicle tires after six years. To wait any longer than that is a gamble with tire integrity and is risky for drivers.

So what can you, as a driver, do to protect yourself? When buying new tires, ask for the newest tires available, and look at the tire’s manufacture date. The manufacture date is a Department of Transportation (DOT) code of 10 or 11 characters embossed on the inside of the tire (see Figure 1). For new tires, the code is always 11 characters. However, tires manufactured before the year 2000 have a 10-character code. Expiration dates for tires manufactured before 2000 were based on a 10-year scale because the expected life-span of a tire was 10 years. Current guidance suggests that tires should be expected to last a maximum of only six years.

Tire Code Photo

Figure 1. A tire manufactured-date code, shown in the yellow box, may appear on the outside of some tires. The 11-character DOT code, shown in the red box, appears on the inside of tires.

Recently, some tire manufacturers have begun to stamp partial codes on the outside of tires (facing away from the vehicle) so that checking the date does not necessitate removing the wheel. This partial code, boxed in yellow  in Figure 1, is the most important piece of information about a tire. These last four digits of the DOT code represent the manufacture date of the tire. The last two digits refer to the year the tire was produced, and the first two digits identify the week number within that year. The tire shown in Figure 1 was manufactured on the 36th week of the year 2001. That tire was on a trailer that had been sitting in a field unused for 10 years, and it showed signs of dry-rot cracking. It is unclear whether trailer tires should be replaced every six years since they do not receive the same daily punishment as automobile tires. However, automobile tires should be replaced every six years.

The majority of people who take the gamble of keeping outdated tires do so to save money. Driving on outdated tires is risky not only for the driver of the car having those tires but also for other drivers. Take the initiative and change vehicle tires every six years, or sooner, to diffuse a potentially dangerous situation.

 

Authored by:
Matt Deskevich, Student Assistant at Penn State University – mdd5309@psu.edu
 
Reviewed by:
Bill Harshman, Penn State University (Has since retired)
Dennis Murphy, Penn State University (Has since retired)
Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
Kerri Ebert, Kansas State University kebert@ksu.edu
 

 

Funding Resources for Assistive Technology for Farmers and Ranchers

Aftermarket Steps on Tractor

Aftermarket Steps on Tractor

Aftermarket steps can improve tractor accessibility.

(Source: AgrAbility for Pennsylvanians)

 
Use the following format to cite this article:
Funding resources for assistive technology for farmers and ranchers. (2015) Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://articles.extension.org/pages/72916/funding-resources-for-assistiv….

 

Individuals can have difficulty locating and qualifying for funding for assistive technology. Farmers and ranchers with disabilities who seek assistive technology can face even more challenges because of their work statuses, their farm or ranch assets, and the types of accommodations they may need to continue working in production agriculture. Assistive technology for those involved in production agriculture may need to be more durable than that needed for people working in other occupations because of the type of work and the work environment. The table that follows provides information about possible funding resources for farmers and ranchers with disabilities.

Funding Source Information Example Notes

National AgrAbility Project

State and Regional AgrAbility Projects (SRAPs)

Currently, more than 20 SRAPs provide direct services to farmers and ranchers with disabilities for their agricultural operations. SRAPs can provide farmers and ranchers who have disabilities with information about modifications for their farm operations. SRAP staff members are knowledgeable about funding options for assistive technology and other opportunities within their state. If you are from a state that does not have a SRAP, contact the National AgrAbility Project.
State vocational rehabilitation agencies The Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) of the US Department of Education provides funding to states to help individuals with disabilities obtain or retain employment. These federal dollars go to the vocational rehabilitation agency within a state. Services, including assistive technology, restoration services, and training, are provided to eligible individuals through an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Examples of available assistive technology include gators/utility vehicles, steps onto a tractor, air suspension seats for a tractor, automatic hitching systems, and hand controls on skid steers. The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act puts an emphasis on transition for students with disabilities. There is also emphasis on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities.
US Department of Veteran Affairs Both the Veterans Health Administration and the Veterans Benefits Administration provide assistive technology to veterans. All veterans who have an honorable discharge are eligible for some services, whether the disability is service-related or not. The Veterans Health Administration can provide durable medical equipment, glasses, hearing aids, Home Improvements and Structural Alterations (HISA) benefits, and grants for veterans who are blind. The Veterans Benefits Administration can provide vehicles (including tractors), home adaptations, and Specially Adapted Housing grants. A veteran must be registered at his or her local Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
Home and Community-Based Services Waivers programs The US Department of Health and Human Services provides funding to states to provide services to people with disabilities in the community. These services are designed to help individuals be independent, safe, and included in the community. Available devices and services include adaptations to vehicles, home modifications, hearing aids, and other assistive technology (environmental controls, specialized computers and software). There are both financial and functional eligibility requirements. Waivers can be used to support farm family members who want to participate in farming activities, live at home, or participate in community activities.

Health insurance

Medicare

Health insurance plans, including private plans, Medicaid, and Medicare, provide Durable Medical Equipment (DME) for enrollees. DME includes canes, walkers, wheelchairs, hospital beds, oxygen equipment, and in-home dialysis equipment. Assistive technology provided by health insurance coverage is directly related to medical need. 
Statewide Assistive Technology Programs Every state and territory has a program that incorporate activities for learning about and acquiring assistive technology.  Most state assistive technology programs provide information about devices, assistive technology demonstrations, equipment lending libraries, and reuse programs. Some have state financing programs. Some of the states include alternative financing programs (AFPs) as part of their assistive technology programs; some provide other allowable programs, including Telecommunication Device Distribution Programs (TDDP).
Alternative Financing Programs (AFPs) The majority of the states and territories (at least 42) have financing programs for the purchase of assistive technology. As part of the Assistive Technology Act, AFPs provide flexible financing terms for people with disabilities and their families. Depending on the state’s program, borrowers have the ability to purchase adapted vehicles, home modifications, hearing aids, computers, tablets, and adapted farm equipment. AFPs provide direct loans, guaranteed loans, interest buy-downs, and traditional loans. Some of the programs are embedded within the state assistive technology project; others are non-profit organizations.
US Department of Agriculture (USDA) loan programs The USDA has several loan programs, along with partial grants, available to eligible low-income homeowners to repair, improve, or modernize their homes.  A variety of financing packages (including grants) are available to individuals, non-profits, consumer cooperatives, and others. These programs can make it possible for a farmer to make repairs on his or her home. Basic repairs (such as a roof repair) are not considered assistive technology and so do not qualify for an AFP loan.
Housing Financing Agencies Every state and territory has a housing financing agency. These agencies incorporate a number of programs that expand affordable, accessible housing options for people with disabilities. States have the ability to develop their own programs. Many states provide flexible financing for home ownership, renovation and repair programs, and programs that finance assistive technology (home modifications) for individuals who have disabilities or long-term health conditions. Many states have created Housing Trust Funds to support the expansion of housing programs. Several states have expanded the funding for these programs with fees or taxes from gas production.
Local service clubs and disability service clubs Many disability and service clubs provide grants to individuals for assistive technology or labor to build, renovate, or repair structures.  Local affiliates of United Cerebral Palsy provide grants for computers and specialized software; many organizations serving individuals with multiple sclerosis provide small grants for home modifications; many agencies serving individuals with ALS have equipment loan closets; Lions Club affiliates provide eyeglasses; and Eagle Scouts work on projects on farms. Also, many Grange and local Farm Bureau organizations and 4H programs have service learning projects and small grant programs. Because there are a variety of small grant programs, it is important to research local resources.
Options Counseling
The Administration for Community Living within the US Department of Health and Human Services is responsible for creating Options Counseling programs in every state. Options Counselors help individuals—primarily those who are aging or who have a disability or health-related diagnosis—develop a plan for addressing long-term services and supports and assist these individuals in connecting with public and private funding, as needed.
Options Counselors are being trained and will have the resources necessary (including state-specific information via the Internet) to help individuals learn about the resources they need to work, live in their own homes, and participate in their communities. Options Counselors are being trained on resources that will help farmers and ranchers with disabilities continue in production agriculture. 
Cooperative Extension System The Cooperative Extension System, which is funded in part by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture within the USDA, has a network of local and regional offices that are staffed by experts who provide information and training opportunities for farmers, ranchers, and farm families interested in topics related to agriculture. Through a network of statewide and local resources, Extension teams can provide farmers, gardeners, and producers with the information needed to start or expand a business, health and safety protocols, and connections to peers, vendors, and information related to emerging businesses. The Extension system is well-coordinated, and Extension staff members have the ability to research and share information that is useful to individual farmers and ranchers.
State Departments of Agriculture Every state and territory has a Department of Agriculture that is staffed by knowledgeable employees and funded with a combination of state and federal dollars.  There are a variety of grant-funded programs available for farmers or others who are interested in production agriculture. Programs cover such topics as business planning, transitions to organic farming, improving soil health, and protecting water quality. Funding for specific programs may not be available every year.  It is important to research what is available within a specific state.
National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT) A non-profit, NCAT hosts a number of programs that promote sustainable agriculture. NCAT’s agriculture work has recently focused on small-scale intensive farming, urban farming, and local foods, and assistance to small farmers, beginning and new farmers, and veterans wishing to become farmers. NCAT has staff members who can assist farmers and ranchers with information and training opportunities. NCAT developed and manages the National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service (ATTRA).
Kiva Zip Kiva provides 0% interest micro-loans to eligible small business owners in the United States. Kiva Zip provides small business loans of up to $10,000 to farmers when other sources of funds are not available. A few programs are working with foundations to expand lending opportunities to entrepreneurs. A program in Philadelphia is designed to expand urban gardening/production. Borrowers must have a viable business or business plan. The loan must be expected to have a positive social impact (for example, food production for urban areas).
Weatherization Assistance Programs The US Department of Energy (DOE) provides grants to states for weatherization assistance. Under DOE guidelines, states give preference to people over 60, families with one or more members having a disability, and low-income families with children. The local weatherization assistance agency carries out an energy audit, makes recommendations, and depending on the needs, provides the necessary work (energy-related). Weatherization assistance programs do not assist with new roofs or siding or similar structural improvements.  However, agencies may be able to coordinate with organizations that provide such assistance.
National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) NRCS is part of the USDA. NRCS financial and technical projects relate to air quality, groundwater conservation, erosion reduction, and so on. NRCS offers programs to eligible landowners and agricultural producers to help sustainably manage natural resources.
Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) SARE has grant opportunities available to producers, students, community organizations, and others. Grants for producers may help with the costs of hosting field days, samples and analyses, labor, and so on (see grant guidelines).

Grants are very competitive. For producers, grant funds cannot be used to buy equipment or to start or expand an operation. Funds can be used for outreach, materials for the funded project, and so on.

 

 

 

 
 
Use the following format to cite this article:

Funding resources for assistive technology for farmers and ranchers. (2015) Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) Community of Practice. Retrieved from http://articles.extension.org/pages/72916/funding-resources-for-assistiv….

 

Authored by:

Susan Tachau, PA Assistive Technology Foundation – stachau@patf.us
 
Reviewed by:
Kirk Ballin, Virginia AgrAbility
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Karen Funkenbusch, University of Missouri – FunkenbuschK@missouri.edu
Dennis J. Murphy, Pennsylvania State University – djm13@psu.edu
Aaron M. Yoder, University of Nebraska – aaron.yoder@unmc.edu
 

Injury Risk Assessment for Supervised Agricultural Experiences


Injury Risk Assessment

(Source: Utah State University)

A supervised agricultural experience (SAE) is one of the three key components of an agricultural education program for high school students. An SAE provides a student with an experiential learning opportunity and is based on one or more of the following categories: entrepreneurship, placement, research and experimentation, or exploration.

Importance of an Injury Risk Assessment Protocol for SAEs

The SAE is a broadly defined experience for students and can include but is not limited to working in a job or an internship on a farm or ranch, owning and operating an agricultural business, planning and conducting a scientific experiment, or exploring agricultural career opportunities. The Injury Risk Assessment for SAEs protocol is a resource for evaluating work sites to assess risks for individuals involved with production-based SAEs on those work sites. Production-based SAE safety evaluations and risk assessments must be integral parts of agricultural educators’ visits to production-based SAE sites. Click here to learn more about the importance of safety in production-based SAEs.

Components of the Injury Risk Assessment for SAEs Protocol

The Injury Risk Assessment for SAEs protocol includes the following components: 

SAE Safety Daily Lesson Plan – The daily lesson plan provides agricultural educators with a complete 30-minute lesson that includes an SAE Safety slide presentation.

SAE Code of Practice for Safety Risk Assessment – Educators, employers, and/or parents can have students review and sign this agreement form to state that they will represent their school and FFA Chapter positively with regard to promoting and strengthening student safety while completing an SAE. The Code of Practice should be completed at the beginning of a student’s SAE or the beginning of each school year or as an assignment related to a unit of instruction in an SAE.

Student Self-Assessment of SAE – Students complete this self-evaluation to assess an SAE in relation to supervision, working conditions, and emergencies. The self-assessment should be completed by students as an assignment within the first two weeks of an SAE. An administrator of the SAE should file the completed form for future reference.

Teacher/Parent/Employer Safety Assessment of Student’s SAE – This easy-to-use assessment form was developed specifically for a teacher, a parent, or an employer to conduct a safety assessment of a student’s SAE, based on the job, working conditions, and injury preparedness. Ideally, this form should be completed after the student completes the SAE Code of Practice and Student Self-Assessment documents and after or in conjunction with a scheduled SAE visit. Again, an administrator of the SAE should file the completed form for future reference.

Return to the Safety in Agriculture for Youth (SAY) page.

 
Reviewed and Summarized by:
Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University – lmf8@psu.edu
Dave E. Hill, Penn State University (Has since retired)
Rebecca G. Lawver, Utah State University – Rebecca.lawver@usu.edu
Dennis J. Murphy, Penn State University (Has since retired)
Michael Pate, Penn State University – mlp79@psu.edu

Recursos en Español sobre Seguridad y Salud Agrícola

Los recursos educativos en forma impresa, vídeo y conferencias por internet son valiosos para los productores agrícolas, educadores agrícolas, profesionales de la seguridad y salud agrícola y para el personal del Sistema de Extensión Cooperativa. Además de los recursos disponibles en eXtension y a través de Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH) – eXtension sobre Seguridad y Salud para Fincas  y Ranchos, los recursos de seguridad y salud agrícola están disponibles a través de universidades y organizaciones. La siguiente información proporciona enlaces a publicaciones en español disponibles en Internet publicadas por las universidades y las organizaciones de seguridad y salud agrícola desde el año 2000.

Videos Disponibles en Español

Contenido

Publicaciones o Recursos – Productos Químicos/Pesticidas (Chemicals/Pesticides)

Título Organización Fecha de Publicación
Aunque cerca…sanco. Una guia para prevencion de los riesgos de los pesticidas (Pesticides Nearby…But Staying Healthy) National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety 2003
Cómo lavarse la ropa contaminada de manera segura (How to Safety Wash Contaminated Clothing) New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health

Publicaciones o Recursos – Espacios Confinados (Confined Spaces)

Título Organización Fecha de Publicación
Gas Hazards Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health
Gases del Silo – Un Peligro Escondido (Silo Gases – The Hidden Danger) Penn State University 2014
Peligros del Flujo de Granos (Hazards of Flowing Grain) Penn State University 2013
Seguridad en el Llenado del Silo (Silo Filling Safety) Penn State University 2013

Publicaciones o Recursos – General Farm Safety

Titulo Organizacion Fecha de Publicacion
A Guide to Train Dairy Workers Migrant Clinician Network and National Farm Medicine Center
Comunicar Seguridad. Inglés como salud y seguridad de materiales de capacitación Segundo Idioma (Communicating Safety: English as a Second Language Health and Safety Training Materials

  • Staying Safe at Work with PPE
  • Working Safely in the Parlor
  • Safe Animal Handling and the Holding Area
  • Working Safely with Machinery
  • Preparing for Emergencies
Migrant Clinicians Network 2015
Diez consejos para evitar patadas en la sala de ordeño (Milking Parlor Safety) New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health
En una emergencia, ¡llame al 911! (In an Emergency, Call 911) New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health
Estandar de OSHA sobre Proteccion de Maquinarias (OSHA Machine Guarding Standard) Penn State University 2013
Requerimientos de OSHA sobre ROPS y Capacitacion del Operator (OSHA ROPS and Operator Instruction Requirements) Penn State University 2013
Seguridad en las lecherías (Immigrant Dairy Worker Health and Safety) Migrant Clinician Network & National Farm Medicine Center 2013 – 2015
Un Resumen de las Leyes y los Reglamentos que Afectan a la Agricultura (A Summery of Laws and Regulations Affecting Agriculture) Penn State University 2013

Publicaciones o Recursos – Tractores y Maquinarias (Tractors and Machinery)

Título Organización Fecha de Publicación
10 Sugerencias de Seguridad con los ATV (Top 10 Suggestions for ATV Safety) Penn State University 2014
10 Sugerencias de Seguridad con las Cortadoras de Cesped (Top 10 Safety Tips for Lawnmowers) Penn State University 2014
10 Surgerencias de Seguridad con los Mini Cargadores (Top 10 Safety Tips for Skid Steers) Penn State University 2014
10 Surgerencias de Seguridad con los Tractores (Top 10 Safety Tips for Tractors) Penn State University 2014
Agriculture Safety: All-Terrain Vehicle Hazards during Farm Work Fact Sheet OSHA 2016
Agriculture Safety: Preventing Farm Vehicle Backover Incidents Fact Sheet OSHA 2016
Agriculture Safety: Protecting Workers from Tractor Hazards Fact Sheet OSHA 2016
Agriculture: Protecting Farmworkers from Tractor and Harvester Hazards QuickCard  (Protegiendo a los trabajadores agrícolas de los peligros de tractores y cosechadoras) OSHA 2014
Agriculture: Backing Up Farm Vehicles and Equipment Safely QuickCard OSHA 2014
ATVs y Juventud: Vehiculos Adecuados Para Ninos (ATVs and Youth: Matching Children and Vehicles) Penn State University 2014
El Uso Seguro de Vehiculos Todo Terreno en la Agricultura (The Safe Use of ATVs in Agriculture) Penn State University 2013
Estabilidad e Inestabilidad del Tractor (Tractor Overturn Hazards) Penn State University 2014
Rx para la Seguridad en Carreteras con SMV: Sea Visible (Rx for SMV Highway Safety: Be Conspicuous) Penn State University 2013
Seguridad con Camiones Volcadores y Remolques en las Granjas (Farm Dump Truck and Trailer Safety) Penn State University 2013
Seguridad con la Toma de Fuerza (PTO) (Power Take-Off (PTO) Safety) Penn State University 2014
Seguridad al Usar el Tractor (Tractor Safety) Kansas State University 2006
Senales de Mano Agricolas (Hand Signals) Texas Department of Workers Comp
Tractor Safety – Page 1 and Page 2 Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health

Publicaciones o Recursos – Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional (Occupational Safety and Health)

Título

7 Pasos de seguridad en escaleras

Organización

Center for Construction Research and Training

Fecha de Publicación

N/A

Agriculture: Protecting Workers from Tripod Orchard Ladder Injuries QuickCard OSHA 2014
Agriculture: Safe Use of Tripod Orchard Ladders Fact Sheet OSHA 2014
Consejos de seguridad para el frío de invierno (Cold Weather Safety Tips) New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health
Consejos de seguridad para los ojos de los trabajadores (Eye Protection Safety for Workers) New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health
Enfermedades por Calor y Agricultura (Heat Illness in Agriculture) Penn State University 2014
¡Gánele al calor! (Beat the Heat!) New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health
Hearing Loss Prevention, Skin Cancer, and Whole Body Vibration Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health
La Prevención de Lesiones a la Espalda (Back Injury Prevention Safety Training Program) Texas Department of Workers Comp
Peligros Respiratorios en las Fincas (Farm Respiratory Hazards) Penn State University 2014
Trabaje con seguridad con la escalera de huerta (Working Safely with Orchard Ladders) New York Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health

Publicaciones o Recursos – Poblaciones Especiales (Special Populations)

Título Organización Fecha de Publicación
Creacion de areas de juego seguras en granjas miniedicion  (Creating Safe Play Areas of Farms) National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety 2010
Safety Guidelines for Hired Adolescent Farm Workers National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety 2010

Videos Disponibles en Español – Videos Available in Spanish

Los vídeos son recursos educativos valiosos para los productores agrícolas, educadores agrícolas, profesionales de la seguridad y salud agrícola y para el personal del Sistema de Extensión Cooperativa. Además de los recursos disponibles en extension y en el sitio web Farm and Ranch eXtension in Safety and Health (FReSH), los recursos de seguridad y salud agrícola están disponibles a través de universidades y organizaciones. La siguiente información provee enlaces a videos en español publicados desde el año 2000 por las universidades y las organizaciones de seguridad y salud agrícola.

Animales (Animals)

Título Organización Fecha de Publicación

Entrenamiento de Seguridad de Lecheria 1.1 – El Cuidado de los Animales en los corrales (Dairy Safety Training: Outside Animal Care)

8:58 minutes

Centros de Seguridad y Salud Agrícola de los EEUU 2015
 
5:04 minutes
Centros de Seguridad y Salud Agrícola de los EEUU 2015
 
4:19 minutes
Centros de Seguridad y Salud Agrícola de los EEUU 2015
 
8:27 minutes
Centros de Seguridad y Salud Agrícola de los EEUU 2015

Previniendo lesiones por piquetes de agujas – El uso apropiado en lecherías (Preventing Needlestick Injuries – Proper Use on Dairy Farms)

2:30 minutes

Salud y seguridad agrícola del medio oeste superior (Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health)

2015

Previniendo lesiones por piquetes de agujas – En granjas porcinas (Preventing Needlestick Injuries – Proper Use on Swine and Hog Farms)

2:33 minutes

Salud y seguridad agrícola del medio oeste superior (Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health)

2015

Salud en el trabajo (Occupational Health)

Título Organización Fecha de Publicación

Enfermedades por el Calor (Heat Illness)

Centros de Seguridad y Salud Agrícola de los EEUU 2014
Farm Shop Safety SAIF 2016

Lesiones de Escalera (Ladder Injuries)

Centros de Seguridad y Salud Agrícola de los EEUU 2015

 

Productos Químicos y Pesticidas (Pesticides)

Título Organización Fecha de Publicación
Como Protegerse de los Pesticidas en el Trabajo (Sección 1 de 2) Centros de Seguridad y Salud Agrícola de los EEUU 2014
Despues del Trabajo: Proteja a Su Familia (Sección 2 de 2) Centros de Seguridad y Salud Agrícola de los EEUU 2014

Tractores y Maquinarias (Tractor & Machinery)

Título Organización Fecha de Publicación
Señales con las Manos (Agricultural Safety Signals) Universidad de Penn State 2011
Seguridad con Tractores Agrícolas: Más Allá de Arados y Tomas de Fuerza  Farm Tractor Safety: More than Plows and PTOs Departamento de Trabajo e Industrias del Estado de Washington 2010
Para Su Seguridad: Prácticas de Seguridad con Segadoras Industriales y Agrícolas For Your Safety: Industrial and Agricultural Mower Safety Practices Asociación de Fabricantes de Maquinarias (AEM) 2005
Módulo I: Vestimenta Segura (Safe Personal Dress) Universidad de Penn State 2013
Módulo II: Equipo de Proteccion Personal (Personal Protective Equipment) Universidad de Penn State 2013
Módulo III: Senales Con Las Manos (Hand Signals) Universidad de Penn State 2013
Módulo IV: Subir/Bajar y Encender/Apagar Tractores (Starting/Stopping Tractors and Mounting/Dismounting Tractors) Universidad de Penn State 2013
Módulo V: Peligros Mecanicos (Mechanical Hazards) Universidad de Penn State 2013
Módulo VI: Revision De Pre-Operacion (Pre Operational Check-ups) Universidad de Penn State 2013
Módulo VII: Ejemplos de Practicas de Trabajo Seguras e Inseguras (Examples of Safe and Unsafe Practices) Universidad de Penn State 2013
seguridad de skid steer loader (Skid Steer Loader Safety) Universidad de Penn State  
Tractor Safety Elements SAIF Consejo de Corporación y Agronegocios de Oregan 2011